Stripey

finished objects, sewing
a woman twirls in a striped Wiksten tank top and Fumeterre skirt from Deer and Doe.

We escaped upstate for a long weekend. And, me being me, I made sure we had a few moments to squeeze in a photoshoot of this new skirt/top combo. After quarantining in the city for 3 months, it was amazing to be somewhere else. We went on 2 fire tower hikes and spotted some small snakes (eep!). Upstate New York is glorious in June.

The Skirt

Anyway, here’s the story of these garments. I had some Merchant and Mills linen in my stash since last summer. I wanted to make something special with it, and earmarked it for a dress. Then, I thought of making a summery Fumeterre skirt instead. I hesitated because the thought of matching those stripes seemed overwheliming. After deliberating, I decided to give it a try. I re-created the fabric pattern in Figma, since this fabric has one-way stripes. I decided to focus on matching the angled mitres. I labeled 8 pieces of washi tape with each panel name (left front, left side front, right front, right side front, etc). I worked in groups of two so I could ensure the stripes matched at each mitre. I cut out 1 piece, then took its matching pattern piece, flipped it over, and matched the already cut stripes to it. I stuck the labels on each panel and sewed the angled seam. This labeling and batching system helped me keep everything straight.

The skirt buttons are from Haulin’ Hoof Farm Store. I bought them at Vogue Knitting Live this year (crazy to think about going to an event like that with SO MANY PEOPLE). I was dumb and skipped the interfacing for the placket, and you can tell. I added an “inside button” between the first and second buttons below the waistband to help with gaping. I shortened the skirt by several inches because the length of my first Fumeterre makes it very hard to walk. I am very fond of the midi skirt length.

a vector mockup of the fabric.
^ this is not how i ended up cutting out the skirt
progress photos of making a Fumeterre skirt from Deer and Doe
You can barely tell that I didn’t worry about making the straight stripes perfect. It looks like a 5-panel skirt!
a striped Fumeterre skirt from Deer and Doe with pretty blue buttons.

For the waistband and skirt hem facing, I used some leftover Spectrum Cotton from Purl Soho. I had so little fabric that I pieced the facing, but I can’t tell. I love how the facing and the waistband lining contrast with the linen stripes. The spectrum cotton is pricey but its so nice and soft. I will definitely use it again.

A Wiksten tank top and Fumeterre skirt from Deer and Doe laid on a deck.
a woman stands outside wearing a long striped Fumeterre skirt from Deer and Doe.

The Tank

I had very few scraps after cutting the skirt. But, I did have enough to eek this modified Wiksten tank out of the leftovers. I had so little left that I had to cut 2 pieces for the bodice front.

I cropped the tank by several inches and removed almost all the A-line shaping and hem curve. I also added a hand-stitched deep hem facing. There’s something about the armholes/strap drafting of this tank that I don’t love. The back gapes at the neck and the arms don’t lay nicely. The linen stripes are carrying this top, for sure. Overall, though, its a great summer top!

a woman stands outside, wearing a striped Wiksten tank.

Me Made May Week 4+

me made may

Woo-hoo. Made it through! The pandemic made capturing photos challenging, but it was a nice motivator to get dressed in real clothes every day. Thanks for reading!

May 31

a very wrinkly Alice top from Tessuti and a Brumby skirt from Megan Nielsen

May 30

I wore my new Fumeterre skirt again! (see May 24th)

May 29

Kabuki tee again from Paper Theory

May 28

May 27

May 26

unblogged Alice top from Tessuti

May 25

Heavily modded Wiksten tank (will blog about it soon with yesterday’s skirt!)

May 24

Fumeterre skirt from Deer and Doe (will post about this one soon!)

May 23

May 22

I didnt get a photo and I don’t remember what I wore 😦

Me Made May 2020: Week 2

me made may

May 14

Paper Theory Kabuki tee again.

May 13

never blogged about stretch-linen Esther shorts from Tessuti

May 12

Peplum tank from In the Folds and that trusty linen Brumby skirt from Megan Nielsen.

May 11

a very terrible photo of the Dove top I wore on May 9th. (Megan Nielsen)

May 10

May 9

The struggle is real for indoor daily photos… i wore these rigid Dawn Jeans from Megan Nielsen.

May 8

May 8: Myosotis dress from Deer and Doe (and another errand!)

Me Made May 2020: Week 1

me made may

Confession: I totally forgot about Me Made May until May 3. Back in April it was on my mind, but it fell away. So, I recreated my outfits from May 1st and 2nd as laydowns. Because it makes more sense for the scrollback, I’m going to go in total reverse order, so May 1 will be at the end of this post, and May 7 at the top.

May 7

Kabuki tee from Paper Theory (and a mask! we went to the grocery store, oh boy!)

May 6

Lina linen tank from Elizabeth Doherty and a hand-rolled silk scarf.

May 5

Tectonic sweater from Emily Greene and a Moss skirt from Grainline Studio

May 4

May 3

May 2

Kabuki Tee from Paper Theory

May 1

Blaire Shirtdress

finished objects, sewing
a button-down shirtdress on a hanger.

A friend sent me some awesome woven fabric she found at an estate sale. She asked if I wanted it, describing it as “Emily fabric.” Spoiler alert: I said yes, and when it arrived last week, I immediately got to work. I thought it would look great as a shirtdress, so I gave the Blaire pattern from Style Arc another go. The first time around I made the shirt version, so this time I wanted to make the dress.

To compliment the elaborate woven fabric, I used some bright blue scraps for the pockets. I think they go together pretty nicely. I drafted a hem facing instead of hemming as the pattern suggests. When I made the shirt version of this pattern, the hem was a nightmare because of the X-TREME curves, so I wanted to come up with an alternate solution. I googled “blaire style arc hem facing” and found a particularly helpful post from someone who accomplished this quite nicely, so with my initial instinct validated, I went for it.

I feel too strange to go outside for pictures right now, so instead here are some COVID-style glamor shots of the details:

a close up of the shirtdress collar.
pretty happy with how this collar came out.
a closeup of the shirtdress pocket with a contrasting lining.
closeup of the pocket!
a closeup of the topstitching on the pocket.
a closeup of the hem facing.
the pocket sticks out a teeny bit, very cute detail.

COVID FO #2 and #3: Kabuki Tee

finished objects, sewing

Friday night, I cleared off my makeshift work desk to reveal my sewing machine, because I thought sewing would help me relax and feel like things are temporarily “normal.” I’ve had the Kabuki Tee from Paper Theory on my to-make list for a long time, so I decided to give it a go. I decided to use this extremely soft vintage cotton/poly blend from my stash, so I got to cutting.

a blue and green plaid top on a hanger.

This is the most comfortable woven top I’ve ever made. The body has great shaping, but still has a boxy look. The fabric certainly adds to its comfort, but the unique arm drafting makes it so easy to move around in.

So, I couldn’t let it go at that, and immediately decided to cut out another version in some eyelet. I spent some serious time figuring out how to arrange the pattern pieces to make the small amount of leftovers I had work. I didn’t have anything that I thought would look nice underneath the eyelet, so I went with silk organza. I hand-basted the organza to the eyelet and used it as an underlining, and used french seams througout. One exception: I bound the armhole seams with bias tape. I decided to blindstitch the armhole and waist hems to make it feel a little more fancy. The organza helps “diffuse” whats happening underneath, and works very well as a modesty layer.

a white eyelet top on a hanger.
an inside-out eyelet top on a hanger.
pretty insides!

Myosotis Dress II

finished objects, sewing
a girl wearing a green and pink floral dress in the bright sun.

Hey, this wasn’t part of my last post! Ahem… a little something bypassed my sewing queue. What is the point of life if not for unplanned sewing projects? I had a long weekend at home, and the idea for this fabric/dress combo popped into my head. Without any hesitation, I got to work. Sewing with fervor like this, running on fumes of whim and inspiration, is one of my favorite parts of life. For 5 hours straight, I didn’t do anything but work on this dress. I don’t experience that level of focus too often, so it felt great. Luckily, the fabric was ready to use because I pre-washed the fabric ages ago. The bonus to all this is now I have a beautiful Myosotis Dress!

a girl wearing a green and pink floral dress in the bright sun.
a girl wearing a green and pink floral dress in the bright sun.

This Blackbird Fabrics viscose has been waiting patiently in my stash for 3 years. The print and dress combo is definitely loud, but I love it. I am not usually on Team Viscose, but I must say it feels delightfully swishy to wear. As you can see, I embraced The Ruffle for this dress. Right now, I’m loving the midi length, but figured if I tire of it I can re-hem to knee length. I don’t have many ruffle-y clothes, we’ll see how they fit in to the rest of my wardrobe.

Construction Notes

a girl wearing a green and pink floral dress in the bright sun.

Except for the ruffles, I used french seams throughout this garment. I should do this more ofte n because french seams look so nice. For the ruffle seams, I used lace tape to hide the raw edges. I haven’t yet, but I’m planning to hand tack them down with a blind stitch.

Unlike my first Myosotis, this version is unlined. I figured that I can wear a slip / undershirt if I want some more layers. Its funny how sometimes I am adamant about lining, but then here I am, not adding a lining and proud. :shrug:

WIDN

knitting, sewing, WIDN

Ages ago in “internet time,” back when I still used Instagram, #WIDN was a popular hashtag for sewers and knitters. WIDN, or “what I’m doing now” is something I’m going to try out here because I miss sharing my in-progress projects. So…. here’s WIDN.

1. Rose Plank Shawl

an in-progress photo of a hand knitted light gray shawl

This beauty is coming along, but slowly because of it’s intricate stitch pattern. I love it and the very special Cormo yarn I’m using, but I’m knitting slowwwwly. I think I am on the cusp of memorizing the repeat…. we’ll see.

2. Weel Riggit

an in-progress photo of a hand knitted, allover colorwork sweater

I’ve had this sweater in my queue since it came out last year. Once it became available as a standalone pattern, it jumped to the top of my queue. I decided to get some Green Mountain Spinnery yarn at Vogue Knitting Live to make my own. I’m trying out the “sleeve as swatch” technique, but I’m not sure how much I like the color combo I chose. I’m going to block the sleeve after I finish and see if I like it.

3. No. 13 coat from Otoko No Kōto No Hon

a photo of a sewing book of mens' coat sewing patterns next to a bolt of yellow calico fabric
I’m going to use this yellow calico for the muslin.

Jacob needs a new spring/fall jacket. Since he has very long arms, no RTW jacket ever fits him perfectly, so I’ve decide to make him one. I scoured the internet to find a suitable pattern, but nothing seemed right. I finally came across a blog dedicated to sewing all the patterns from a Japanese book of mens’ coats, and decided to bite the bullet and order the book. Spoiler alert: the book is entirely in Japanese. I think I’m up for the challenge, but we’ll see what happens when I tear into the muslin. Jacob has picked out No. 13. I am planning to start tracing and making a muslin this weekend. I am looking forward to fabric shopping for it!

Tectonic Test Knit

finished objects, knitting

Here’s my first test-knitted sweater (rav link)! Its Tectonic from Emily Greene.

a woman stares off camera, wearing a hand knit gray sweater.

This task was a unique challenge for me. I had only written instructions and 1 on-body pic from Emily to guide me (which I assume is on par for test knitting). Usually before settling on a pattern to knit, I spend hours looking through Ravelry. I like to see other knitters’ modifications and how their finished objects turned out. Emily did have to help me figure out the sleeve details, I felt pretty challenged by them with limited photo references.


I love the reverse-stockinette and garter stitch combo, its so unique. And how about those statement sleeves!? My favorite part of this sweater design is the foldover neckband. The crochet bind off looks so tidy and professional! The yarn I used is Elder from Ritual Dyes, and its so soft that it doesn’t even feel like wool. Its a joy to wear.
What can I say besides I love this sweater! One of my best knits ever, for sure.

back view of a woman wearing a sweater she knit.
closeup view of a woman wearing a gray sweater she knit.