Tova Dress.

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I am several years late to the Tova Dress party, but I’ve finally made my entrance. I had this Italian double-cloth shirting remnant from Firecracker Fabrics in my stash since Spring, and just couldn’t figure out what to make with it. I agonized over deciding, looking up every indie dress pattern I could think of and then googling to see how other people’s looked. You can see my final decision was the Tova. (I am also wearing my Wiksten Oversized Kimono jacket from Making Magazine!)

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I think I would have been happier with this if I made it a few years ago. There’s nothing wrong with the pattern, I just should have chosen a pattern with more shaping, because I now realize that’s what I was after. If I make this again, I would extend the center front fold line to create more gathers. On this version, it was barely enough to get any at all. The collar also lays a little wonky, and the back neck sits away from my body. I think this pattern would be a better match for thinner or drapier fabric.

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I do love the “rich” feel of this fabric, and I like where I used the contrast side vs the right side on the cuff binding, placket and collar stand. I think once I break it in a little bit I will like it more.

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We had a very unseasonably warm sunny day, so we headed down to Battery Park to take these pics. Very windy, which I bet you could have already guessed!

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Making Mag!

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A little bit late to the party…. I am honored to be a part of Making’s No. 4 issue, Lines. My contribution is a Bento Bag “recipe” designed to use up scraps. These bags make lovely lunch carriers, knitting WIP bags, or extra-special homemade gift wrap. I can’t tell you how exciting it is to have a pattern in print!!! It is so cool! When I received the issue in the mail, I was blown away by the exquisite creativity of every single project. I was so enamored with Jenny Gordy‘s Kimono Jacket, I decided I had to make one immediately! I got some sienna washed linen from fabric.com, as well as some beautiful Liberty Tresco for the lining (treat yo self!). The result is a lovely oversized jacket that is the perfect layer for fall, and oh so soft both inside and out. Its heavy and drapy and comforting, just like Jenny intended.

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This jacket does use a lot of fabric, so be aware of that. If I make another one, I will cut the neck cuff pieces a little bit longer so I have more wiggle room at the bottom hem. I had to fudge the seam allowances to make them line up with the hem. Why does this always happen to me? I cut the size S, and I am glad I didn’t go M.

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See all the wonderful projects for yourself. Order a copy of the newest Making mag (or pick up one from a local stockist)!

underlining.

so i learned about underlining. its sort of like lining, but it lays against the shell fabric and is seamed in with it, so the two pieces act as one. its supposed to add body to the shell fabric (depending on what you use for underlining).

i got some gorgeous blue linen and some cotton muslin at the remnants section of britex in san francisco. i was really struggling with what to make with the fabric, since i didnt have much. i settled on a wiksten dress, but made the small (last time i made the medium). i added pockets and cut the chest pocket on the bias. the side pockets were sort of wonky at first and hung very weirdly inside the dress and made it uncomfortable, so i decided to topstich them on the front of the dress. i really like how they turned out. i also added some back darts but im unsure of how i like them so far (ive only basted them in). as i was finishing the blind hem (which is so worth it no matter what… a machine straight-stitched hem really doesn’t cut it for me at this point), i wondered if the dress looked too “Puritan,” but i got a lot of compliments on it when i wore it yesterday, so im won’t heed that voice in my head.

i will say i don’t love the wiksten pattern, it is very shapeless and has weird gaping issues at the armpits, but i think this could be solved with front darts (although i was too nervous to improv them). but overall, im very happy with the dress result, and i cant wait to wear it when we go to FRANCE next month. please ignore the wrinkles– ITS LINEN, PEOPLE.

 Thank you, Leah for the pics

i really love this water bottle, btw

round up + what’s next.

i’ve made 3 tank tops from 3 different patterns so far:

1:  (top left) Wiksten tank. Pattern cost = $8.50. I made this first, and it is the most simple. No darts (probably won’t make again because of it). I like the pocket.

2: (top right) Deer and Doe Datura blouse. Pattern cost = ~$20. The construction of this top is very professional and its fun to make. It includes variations for two types of collars. Will make again.

3: (bottom) Collette Patterns Sorbetto tank. Pattern cost = pattern is FREE. Has darts and a front pleat. Took me about 3 hours to make. I did an inverse box pleat and hid the bias tape. Will make again.

(I think its about time to move on to a new type of garment, and i think i am banning myself from any more florals…)

Next I am planning a sleeveless Hawthorn with some beautiful greenish bluish linen, and also I NEED TO FINISH my Folded sweater.

In other news, I’ve got some sticky bun dough rising in the kitchen…. mmmmmmm!

currently listening: sound of silver, lcd soundsystem (what else on the longest day of the year??)

the view from Saturday.

nothing has made me happier over the past few Saturdays than waking up early, sewing, and going for a long run when it warms up outside. and now…. wiksten the second, washed and pressed:

this guy is a thrifted-fabric tank, with a slightly embellished pocket. i used grainline’s very helpful tutorial for the bias tape. i highly recommend it… this garment looks Profesh